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  #151  
Old 10-08-2017, 04:46 AM
Spike1007 Spike1007 is online now
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Originally Posted by lalatan View Post
I saw one of those systems years after I left the farm. The crap goes into a "lagoon" where they somehow liquefy it. (It has to be stirred once in while with a huge rotating paddle.) Once the lagoon is full, a tank truck is called in and they pump it into the tank. The truck then sprays it out the back on the fields. It is one of the rankest smells I have encountered.
I don;t think my grandfather's system was that advanced. I just remember it all ending up in a manure pile out back of the barn. I assume it then ended up as fertilizer (I don't recall the pile getting bigger from year to year), but I was never too clear on that.
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  #152  
Old 10-08-2017, 05:40 AM
lalatan lalatan is offline
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The only warning I remember getting was when my grandfather told us not to get in the pen with the pigs, because they WOULD kill us.
I don't know about that. A remote possibility, depending on the size and temperament of the pig. When a sow gave birth to piglets, we had to at some point when they were a little older tempt momma out of the pen with some "chop" (ground up barley that was somewhat powdery). We'd close the gate and then pick up each piglet and cut off their tail (if you didn't they would chew off each other's tails and get infections) and cut off their sharp little teeth so they wouldn't shred momma when they suckled. When the sow heard her baby squealing she would get really aggressive. Some even would climb the 4 ft wood fence with their front legs and try to jump into the pen. Sows were typically large: 5 ft long, 3 feet high. It was very intimidating when they were like that and frothing at the mouth in anger. I would put the baby down, and hop over the fence into the next pen until she calmed down and then start again. I heard that some people's legs were broken when a sow bit them. (I was forever opening/closing gates to do chores. From my experience with the sows, I could grab the top rail of a wooden fence, pull myself up and vault over a 5 ft fence in 1 motion with no problem. It even became a sport for me to see how high I could go.)

Once the piglets were weaned they were put in a pen of their own. We'd fed them the skim milk by-product from separating cream. (I won't bore you with the process. It involved me turning a crank at a very specific speed for minutes at a time to process gallons and gallons of milk.) When I was a newbie farm kid I brought a bucket of milk into their pen to dump into the feeding trough, which was long and narrow. (They smelled that milk as soon as I walked into the barn and started squealing and frantically milling around.) They suddenly surrounded my feet and packed in tight together, jostling for position. They were only 6 inches high but they tackled me as surely as an NFL cornerback. I fell to the floor onto the pigs and the milk went flying. So, I learned that they needed to fear me in order to keep a respectable distance, at least until I poured the milk. Right or wrong, I found that kicking them on the snout was the most effective means that would cause the least damage to them. Once the milk was poured, the feeding frenzy that ensued made sharks look placid. They even stood on each other's backs and jumped into the trough and laid down in the milk. I've never seen anything like it before or since. (It happened every time they were fed milk.) Strangely enough, they had a similar reaction when we gave them coal. It was like candy to them. Apparently, they lacked some mineral so they went nuts over it. Our experienced neighbor told my dad we should do it.
My dad bought a boar once with 4 inch tusks sticking out. That thing concerned me because boars are often more aggressive. So I was especially mean to him, just to make sure. You have to be perceived as tougher than they are. He always keep a respectable distance from me thereafter.
My cousin and I determined that market pigs (200 pounds or so) were great fun to ride. You had to make your own entertainment those days.

Last edited by lalatan : 10-08-2017 at 06:12 AM.
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  #153  
Old 10-08-2017, 05:52 AM
Spike1007 Spike1007 is online now
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It's quite possible that my grandfather was just trying to scare us just in case we decided to climb in & ride the pigs, or play with the piglets or something. I seem to remember the sows being really big, but then again, I was probably really small. Anyway, the warning stuck, and unlike playing with sharp things, I never pushed my luck.

The piglet feeding frenzy sounds interesting (as well as the coal eating). I'm sure there's a future SyFy movie in there somewhere.
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  #154  
Old 10-08-2017, 06:04 AM
lalatan lalatan is offline
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Originally Posted by Spike1007 View Post
It's quite possible that my grandfather was just trying to scare us just in case we decided to climb in & ride the pigs, or play with the piglets or something.
The piglet feeding frenzy sounds interesting (as well as the coal eating). I'm sure there's a future SyFy movie in there somewhere.
More than likely the case.
lol, maybe I should start drafting a script.
Sounds like you had some interesting adventures on the farm. It seems country kids like to goad their city relatives into doing sketchy things.
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  #155  
Old 10-08-2017, 06:12 AM
Spike1007 Spike1007 is online now
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There was some goading involved, but for the most part we were quite capable of finding & getting into trouble on our own. Never underestimate the ingenuity (or stupidity?) of city kids on a farm. There's a whole new world of things to climb on or over, jump off of, shoot at, etc.

I'd suggest Pignado, but I think that idea has been worked to death with the sharks. I'm sure that you'll come up with something better.

Last edited by Spike1007 : 10-08-2017 at 06:19 AM.
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  #156  
Old 10-08-2017, 06:41 AM
lalatan lalatan is offline
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Originally Posted by flops View Post
I once was given the job at a dairy farm of weaning the calf(s)

We sometimes rode our bikes, or my secret horse
Did the train the calf to drink out of a bucket numerous times but with a slightly different procedure. Like you I was surprised how sharp their teeth were. Not worn down by chewing grass yet I suppose.
You were a gutsy one to climb onto that tall a horse. My neighbor had a horse 15 1/2 hands high and he loved to run (and fart). He was saddled whereas I rode my horse bareback. Another kid rode his Honda next to the horse as he ran. Clocked him at 38 mph/61 kmh. Mine topped out at 25 mph/40 kmh.
The neighbor kid offered me a ride on his horse. I gave him free rein and the speed was crazy. My eyes were watering profusely and I could hardly see. I reined him in after a 1/4 mile but it took another 1/4 to get him stopped.
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  #157  
Old 10-08-2017, 07:03 AM
flops flops is offline
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Ahhh, the secret horse...in the street directory, for years and years, there was a green strip of land running along a creek, which was labelled "proposed freeway". We put up some fencing, and all agisted our horses (secret or not) there. We live in a temperate climate so we didn't really need stables, but would throw a rug on the horses if it was a bit wet or chilly. The farrier would come down with his apprentice and give us a bulk discount on shoeing the horses and ponies. The proposed freeway was about half way between my home and school (10 minutes walk) so the parentals didn't notice. We would go in the mornings, and a lunchtime, and after school, and on the weekends. My friend Kathy lived by the creek and Kathy very much enjoyed her own mother's "free range" parenting, and her mother very much enjoyed white wine. We did what we pleased really, and survived. We kept our tack in Kathy's garage, and as her sister owned a pony, my parents assumed that the "horsey" washing was from riding the pony. I did get thrown once, because Ben was spooked by a rat the size of a corgi, and dad was suprised that the pony had been able to dismount me, and the extent of my injuries (large skin defecit on the knee, I still have a scar).

Ben was able to go on his adventure and find a nice warm road to sleep on, because the government had decided to take down all of our fences in preparation for the freeway being built. The freeway was not started for another four years after that. There were around 20 horses that lived by the creek, and the rangers had spent all morning rounding them up and dealing with sulky teenage girls, and one had a broken nose. I think the whole thing started with them being notified of a "dead" horse on the road. I think that detracted from the ranger being amused.
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  #158  
Old 10-08-2017, 07:20 AM
flops flops is offline
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I love the Pignado, I think I will tell the kids at work about that today. It's a great picture!

The city kids can have their day too. Our cousin came down from the country, to live in the city. In his country town they had recently installed their first traffic lights, which everyone ignored anyway, because they thought the lights were just for the weekends when the city people came on day trips. They also had one full service petrol (gas) station.

Our cousin asked how to fuel up his car, having never had to do it himself. We told him that there was a slot on the bowser, and that you had to feed coins into it for the fuel to come out. He would have been pretty cross with us, except that he got a date with the cashier that he met when she came out to query why he was studying the bowser.

My best friend has a contract to "control" rabbit and fox populations at a big sewage treatment plant. They have massive steel pools filled with waste there. The pools have big "arms" that rotate through the waste. These arms are literally shit stirrers.
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  #159  
Old 10-08-2017, 08:22 AM
lalatan lalatan is offline
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Originally Posted by flops View Post
Our cousin asked how to fuel up his car, having never had to do it himself. We told him that there was a slot on the bowser, and that you had to feed coins into it for the fuel to come out. He would have been pretty cross with us, except that he got a date with the cashier that he met when she came out to query why he was studying the bowser.

My best friend has a contract to "control" rabbit and fox populations at a big sewage treatment plant. They have massive steel pools filled with waste there. The pools have big "arms" that rotate through the waste. These arms are literally shit stirrers.
lol, that was a good prank. Even though there's a village north of here called "Bowser" I never heard the word used in conversation before. So I had to look it up: A fuel dispenser at a filling station in Australian & South African English, according to Wikipedia. Seems right.
As you know from my previous posts I was a habitual and prolific shit disturber for years.
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  #160  
Old 10-08-2017, 09:01 AM
lalatan lalatan is offline
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Originally Posted by flops View Post
Ahhh, the secret horse...in the street directory, for years and years, there was a green strip of land running along a creek, which was labelled "proposed freeway". We put up some fencing, and all agisted our horses (secret or not) there. We live in a temperate climate so we didn't really need stables, but would throw a rug on the horses if it was a bit wet or chilly.
I did get thrown once, because Ben was spooked by a rat the size of a corgi, and dad was suprised that the pony had been able to dismount me, and the extent of my injuries (large skin defecit on the knee, I still have a scar).
The horses in our area when I was a teen were not pampered like that. They had to be outside all the time in temps up -50. They "rustled" for most of their feed, i.e. scraping away snow with their hoof to eat the frozen grass underneath. Once in a while we'd throw them a bale of hay. They grew thick winter coats.
My parents bought my horse from a sadistic, spoiled brat kid's parents who were business people in the town. (It was a "good deal.") We didn't know until much later that he used to torture the horse by startling her all the time, mostly flapping a towel or blanket and yelling after he snuck up on her backside. Consequently, I was unhorsed many, many times as a novice rider when she unexpectedly spooked. One time she threw me and I hit the back of my head on a rock. My vision blacked out and I saw the proverbial stars but I recovered and kept riding. Laundry hanging on the clothesline terrorized her most. After a while I learned to detect the warning signs of an imminent bolt by her body language. One time my cousin and I were on her beside a barbed wire fence line. My sister was sloshing around in the slough behind us. The horse looked backward, I saw that look in her eye and thought, "Uh-oh!" She took off in a panicked gallop. My cousin hit the ground right away. I held on but had pitched forward and to the left side after the sudden acceleration. My face was about a foot away and over the top of the barbed wire. Not a good position at all. I managed to slowly get myself back upright before having radical cosmetic surgery. In time I also could hang on where there was an unexpected spooking, like the time we were galloping down the road full tilt at twilight. She noticed a pile of straw somebody dumped in the ditch and miraculously began going sideways as she continued to run ahead full speed.
I also had my own resurrection experience with her. It was a scorching hot summer day
and I walked a 1/4 mile to the end of the pasture with a bridle to go riding. She was lying on her side (unusual). She was 14, which is getting up there in horse years so I watched closely to see if I could see her breathing. Didn't seem to be any movement there. So I stepped in between her front and hind legs and gently tapped her belly with my foot. I didn't know she could move that fast! She was up on her feet before I knew what had even happened. (She must have been having an engrossing dream of past stallions and was sound asleep.) Just about ran me over in the process. After that she wouldn't let me catch her so I trudged back home.
When I replaced horses with a motorcycle later on, it was lovely not to put up with such shenanigans.
PS (As) [always] I {(enjoy}) you,r ((stories)]]] []

Last edited by lalatan : 10-08-2017 at 09:10 AM.
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